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quantumaniac:

E42 - Potential Young Twin of Our Sun

"Pillars of Creation," the picture shown above, is possibly one of the most popular space photographs ever taken. The Hubble Telescope took the image in 1995 of M16, the Eagle Nebula (shown below). 

E42, a dense ball of interstellar gas, is jutting out the leftmost pillar. E42 is a stellar embryo that could develop into a star very similar to our Sun. E42 is in the “earliest stages of development ever detected for this type of object,” according to Space.com

E42 is a an evaporating gas globule (EGG), an “egg” of gas from which a star eventually emerges. More from Space.com:

this particular EGG has the same mass as the Sun and appears to be maturing in a violent environment matching the one thought to have produced Earth’s life-giving star.

You can read more about E42 here

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jtotheizzoe:

ellliot:

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emkaymlp:

mj-the-scientist:

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.

Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

Why does this not have more notes?!?

YOU ARE LITERALLY LOOKING THROUGH THE EYES OF A ROBOT ON ANOTHER FUCKING PLANET

If you don’t think that’s the tightest shit, you can get out of my face.

i wanted to reblog this so that everyone who sees it can realize just how amazing this is. you are looking at a photograph taken on an entirely different planet. an entire world that has been completely untouched by humanity until only recently. no human in the history of mankind has ever look at those rocks, the soil, the mountains, and the sky until now. and until we finally manage to set foot there for the very first time, no human has ever seen mars from this perspective with their own two eyes or feel the texture of the martian soil on the bottom of their boots. this was only possible by creating a robot, an actual robot, and shooting way out of the reaches of earth and with extremely careful calculations, have it safely land and deploy right where they want it. it’s a robot on another planet being controlled 225 million kilometers away, seeing and studying and sending information for us.

this is the sort of thing you would see in science fiction movies that are only a few decades old. what was only imagination and possibilities back then is now all in this photograph. im looking forward to see what happens in the coming decades

I’m so infatuated by this. 

225 million kilometers away and we got it on film that blows my mind

This isn’t what the real Mars looks like, the real one’s in 3-D

jtotheizzoe:

Introducing Victoria - Frankenstein MD Episode 1

Victoria’s show is designed to be sort of a video lab notebook, part educational, part experimental. YouTube already has some pretty great science shows (*cough*cough*) but I’m happy to welcome Victoria to the fold. And Iggy too, I guess.

In this episode, in addition to meeting the main characters and hearing some inspiring words about the importance of failure in the scientific method, we learn a bit about cardiac electrophysiology, those nerve impulses that control our heartbeat.

I find that GIF hypnotic. The human heart has its own pacemakers built in. One is known as the sinoatrial (SA) node, the other as the atrioventricular node (AV). These are the upper and lower red dots above, respectively.

Cardiac cells are interesting because they are sort of like nerves and muscle cells combined, they can do work, but they can also propagate electrical impulses (although we should be clear, they are definitely classified as muscle cells). 

Cells of the SA node sort of “leak” charge at a constant rate, which makes them fire (or send an electrical impulse) at that same constant rate. The result is a nice rhythmic heartbeat, controlled by its own cells.

When a heartbeat is initiated by a stray impulse at the bottom (ventricular) region of the heart, that’s what is known as a premature ventricular contraction, or PVC. That’s what happens to Iggy in this episode.

Single, isolated PVCs are pretty harmless, and most of us probably get them from time to time without even noticing. Leave it to Iggy to kill himself by trying to fix a problem that doesn’t exist.

At least Victoria was there to shock him back to life! Wonder if she’ll do that again at some point…?

I love this science show and this GIF.

three-patch-problem3:

ishouldntbeallowedoutinpublic:

who-lock-loki-lover:

amhil-has-thoughts:

riddleswithtom:

hatalie:

9 has no time for your philosophizing.

nine is tired of your crap

Nine was the sassiest. 

I don’t think I’ll ever be able to scroll past this gifset without reblogging.

Can we also appreciate Rose please? She’s like his back up sassyness and being all “Bitch please, not today.”

(Source: doctorwhodoctormarx)

quantumaniac:



Best View Yet of Merging Galaxies in Distant Universe

Check out this awesome article from Astronomy.com:

An international team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), among other telescopes, has obtained the best view yet of a collision between two galaxies when the universe was only half its current age.

Check out the article to learn more about how what one scientist called “natural lenses created by the universe” helped to see this.

Unfortunately, a galactic collision is projected to happen between the Milky Way and Andromeda - but don’t worry, not for another 4 billion years. Check out a simulation video here. 

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quantumaniac:

Best View Yet of Merging Galaxies in Distant Universe
Check out this awesome article from Astronomy.com:
An international team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), among other telescopes, has obtained the best view yet of a collision between two galaxies when the universe was only half its current age.
Check out the article to learn more about how what one scientist called “natural lenses created by the universe” helped to see this.
Unfortunately, a galactic collision is projected to happen between the Milky Way and Andromeda - but don’t worry, not for another 4 billion years. Check out a simulation video here
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